Day jobs for INFJs


#1

What are some good ones? I’m asking because I recently read a bit of “Do What You Are”, that personality-based career guide thing, and I have to say, the section on INFJs was depressing. No wonder I thought I was INFP for years – I wanted to be one due to nonsense like this. But seriously, the INFJs in the book. Unless most other types featured, none had a clear trajectory and seemed to lack any sort of vision for themselves beyond getting by (which I admit is a challenge), and in the end, even the experts don’t seem hopeful. Their top suggestion is Career Counselor. Second, High School Teacher. Not to knock either of these things, but can you be more uninspired? For INFPs, the top one is Artist. WTF.

Sorry, I know all that’s BS. I’m not asking which type deserves the title of Artist in a stupid book. I’m asking what actual vocations an INFJ might be able to tolerate while apparently not really being Artists in the purest sense. Don’t say career counselor or high school teacher, please. (God, not even therapist or college professor? That’s elitist but still, why not aim high? Why limit us to such lackluster professions out of the gate?)

Truth is, my ego is too big to just be all about helping others realize themselves. There’s gotta be other options. Salaried ones. Know of any?


#2

maybe it’s because infjs are so judgmental lol
don’t knock on “uninspired jobs” !

read this article (sales ad for career coaching) and the comments!
http://blog.penelopetrunk.com/2017/11/28/what-infjs-need-most-i-know-because-ive-coached-almost-all-of-them/

(Overall, Penelope will probably say infj are for middle management and homemanager and consultants/counselors)


#3

For a day job, you probably want to specify and tweek artist to have a good potential to keep bills paid. There’s art therapy. I think graphic design would mesh with INFJ intuitive grasp of words and symbology. Journalism seems like it should be on those lists too- get people to tell their stories then write about them in an appealing way. What do you want to do if typology not a factor?


#4

With art therapy, I believe you’d get art course work to develop skills for commercial artist, but also a degree you could support yourself with while finding a market for your art.


#5

Consultancy - political or business, or any sort really.

Consultancy basically involves seeing the problems in the ways of others/businesses/entities, developing a long term strategy / guide for them. And lots of BULL SHIT. INFJs use the Fe part here, selling their consultancy shit to the willing buyers.

INFJs need to remember to use Fe to their advantage and their guile over types that can’t see the big picture so think it’s amazing that someone can see into the next 6 months.

I would say INFJs just need to get their head around numbers, statistics, and polling and shit like that. But it’s easy when you remember evidence and statistics are always skewed, and its fundamentally a creative act. Just use Ni to pre-predict trends and correlations, and then set up data capture to find what proves your argument.

Also PR maybe. Contrary to popular perception a lot of PR experts I’ve met are introverts and softly spoken.

or the priesthood


#6

An infj I know writes grant proposals for a women’s organization.She loves the spin and does well for them.


#7

I don’t know how old you are? Not one of those wise, well-aged INFJs out here, but here is what I think:

Do what you want; do what you like.

At the end of the day, all of us have received very different influences. Any INFJ will differ from the next INFJ. If you think you’ve received your calling, trust your guts. Believe it or not, Fe aux and Ti tert will help with a lot of careers. Know your strengths and weaknesses, and trust your guts to find a strategy that works for you. And make sure you are working out of joy, and check every now and then to assess whether your motivations have altered into something else (e.g. fear, anxiety, worrying about status, thinking you are shit and needing to prove yourself…)

I think INFJs will definitely have great success with counselling or therapy or teaching, sorry to say. But I understand your viewpoint here that we have a bit of an ego and that perhaps a humble job such as counselling just won’t cut the chase for our hungry ambitions…But some people find great satisfaction in that, and many have discovered a calling for this long ago. You don’t seem so into it though, so maybe something else?

I’m going to say that INFJs could make great academic careers. How about an academic position in a humanities department, literature or art studies? Psychology? Won’t give you a great salary though but it’ll give you somewhat of a salary if you indeed make it to the end (being a tenured professor). I think Ni is much more well-received in such fields than let’s say hard sciences, and Ti and Fe will bring you a long way, methinks. INFJs can produce original insights, have their voices and opinions out, and enjoy understanding the things that involve people. INFJs of course, naturally like this. Hard sciences will be more tricky, but I think it can be done in certain cases. Believe it or not, I’ve seen a lot of successful INFJ science academics, at least in biology as this is arguably less “hard” than physics or chem, and requires less genius Ti and Ne, as the stuff you do is built on the principles or techniques generated by very smart physicists and chemists. Fe is also advantageous in life sciences-related fields. Definitely isn’t for every INFJ.

I also second RumDawg that INFJs would make great consultants. Have been toying with taking on that career path, too. Need lots of beautiful, hoodwinking Fe, Ni foresight, and some problem solving skills. I can’t say I know exactly everything that entails this sort of job. I’ve heard it could be quite stressful with lots of travels and such. But I’ve heard a few people with very short consultancy careers as that was enough to land them the big bucks, enough to quit and do whatever humble, lowpaying dream job they ever wanted to do… Think about dat. :stuck_out_tongue:

Journalism, yeah I think so too. But depends what kind. I can imagine INFJs writing really cool critiques of literature or art. But again, barely a salaried job?

I think the downside of careers such as consultancy or journalism, is that said INFJ may be deprived of doing something that really comes from their “souls.” INFJs may have a deepdown itch to make a name-break out of something driven by their passions, and consultancy or journalism may not give them that “chase” in the end. But perhaps it is that sort of desire in the first place that fucks them up from the beginning. There is also the pressure of time in journalism, and I think INFJs prefer something flowing, and act more instinctively/intuitively than they think.

Other things I could think of. PR seems to make sense, too.

Sorry I couldn’t really help. It really depends on you. Do you want to make a name? Do you want to contribute to new ideas, knowledge, or thought? Do you just want a job that you can enjoy but is suitable for your set of strengths/weaknesses? I think every INFJ may differ in answer, but definitely don’t trust in those shitty books. They don’t know what they’re talking about, as they don’t understand the MBTI types in the first place.

You know yourself better; you know it.

INFJs should do what they like and remember this motivation again and again because time, pressure, dealing with realities, red-tape, schmoozing, blah, blah, and all other things that will be demanded in almost EVERY job will stress INFJs out. So they need a reason and motivation in the first place.


#8

Ran out of likes. Thanks, never thought of this!


#9

Wtf, were they using Socionics typecodes or something? Those suggestions should literally be swapped lol


#10

There are no day jobs for INFJs. Day jobs are for ISTJs and the like.

But here are some general suggestions for INFJ vocational direction, based on experience.

  1. Give up on having a worldly identity or title. It will only slow you down and promote Ni-Ti loop issues.
  2. Do not work for other people…ever. Do the work to become independent, whatever the cost. There is no other person on the planet that will ever offer a vision that you can honestly follow in place of your own.
  3. Don’t be integral. You are the most expendable part of any team. You’re strengths come in being able to pass through reality and drop little pieces of gold for others, things they need and things that let them grow. As a business owner, contractor, etc., you can do this while protecting yourself… Otherwise, you do more damage to others when you deny your own nature. All jobs end in your revolting against your bosses. Period.
  4. Move around. Wander. Don’t stay in one job for more than a year. Own it, and love it. You cannot have the life that others have, such as decades of one job with a retirement. Give that up. If you don’t, others will suffer.
  5. Try not to kill yourself. Motivation and vision will never be enough. You are the wandering mystics of the world. People love what you give them, but they will be the first to throw you out the airlock when things get rough. You are made for slaughter.

In short, be an artist and find a sugar daddy/momma. INFJ’s are simultaneously the most important and the most useless part of any society.

P.S. - HItler was looking for a “day job”, and look how that turned out.


#11

Awesome. I would work for you if it were possible.


#12

I don’t know what day job means exactly but the way I picture what that means, I don’t think istjs go for day jobs necessarily? My istj mother’s job is pretty much a day/night obsession. She isn’t her own boss however. But she is as free lance as she could achieve without being her own boss. And she pretty much breathes work. It’s not like, oh 5pm. Work is over. Life begins. Nope nothing like that.


#13

Agreed. That’s a good distinction. “Day Job” to me means a career…defining work that is what you do in the world and the reason you breath.

But perhaps we need to add some nuance? Perhaps I’m addressing “vocation” rather than a source of income. Live to work, or work to live? This dichotomy kills the INFJ, because they have no real sense of work and non-work. It’s all “being” or “non-being”.

I love all the types, and what they bring to the table. INFJs, however, are best when they show up at the table, drop some artifacts down, mutter some riddles, and then leave mysteriously…

…like Gandalf.


#14

Yeah istj doesn’t see it that way. There is more straight up acceptance. Although they can get so into the universe their job becomes. But maybe it’s not “life’s meaning”.


#15

Keep your head up and work hard, and one day INFJs you might just be fuhrer.


#16

Yeah, I really didn’t say they did. Was talking about INFJs, with an unfortunate reference to ISTJ that’s getting hacked to pieces.Merely implied that ISTJs are good at having stable careers, which is 100% true.Not saying/caring about anything beyond that.


#17

Maybe that is why INFP got artist in that career guide; I think INFP would be more content spending their time creating art in impoverished conditions without making much profit from it. INFJ is more high maintenance and needs a day job/ trust fund/ sugar daddy or momma. I think both types suited for being artists.


#18

What about INFPs? I remember Blake wrote a post at some point saying they should work with children. Is there anything besides that though?


#19

lol


#20

Oh, yes! Yes, yes, yes.

I wish I’d put that in my resume years ago…

And I’d like to add that INFJs are at their worst when some annoying git of an ESTJ grabs hold of their wizard sleeves before they can leave mysteriously, strands them on top of Orthanc and forces them to fill out pointless paperwork for all eternity as punishment for their hubris.