Keith Haring


#1

Hey guys, it’s been a while since I’ve been on the forum, but I just wanted to get some opinions from the best on Keith Haring’s type… He was an artist back in the 70’s and 80’s–a really interesting guy. I myself am leaning toward INFJ or ENFJ for him, but I can’t be certain. Does anyone have an opinion on him?


#2

Hmm well initial thoughts looking at the art alone is I wouldn’t have pegged him as INFJ looking at his art - it’s quite loud, colourful in your face and crude. I imagine INFJ art to feel a bit more filmy dark. Will need to watch some interviews and see what he’s like!


#3

Basquiat was INFJ, according to Blake.
I’m not saying anything about Keith Haring though.


#4

My initial hunch is that Keith Haring is ENTP.


#5

Enfp
I’m almost sure.
I can’t explain it verbally :confused:
But I can see it.


#6

Yeah I see what you’re saying but I wouldn’t compare the two artists, there’s a more personal tortured rawness in Basquiat’s art, haunted insanity that I don’t see in Haring. Haring’s has more of a social feel, a message with a bit of psychedelicness - more Ne in feel (ENFP?) or S coming through (but I knew the words I chose wouldn’t convey what I meant properly!

Ah, I see @natinka sees it too


#7

It’s the way of the composition - the relation between the objects and details, its’ rhythm…


#8

I definitely agree that Basquiat was INFJ. I think Haring made his art with the world in mind, while Basquiat made his because he had to, or else risk insanity. Haring was more about social causes and morality, so that definitely could be ENFP.


#9

I think it’s easier to start to define visual artists by observing their paintings - beginning with extrovert or introvert function.

Here is an example. You see the differences?


#10

Most of the time we’re not aware of this slight movement of our eyes, but it’s quite simple.
In Basquiat’s painting’s the eye moves inward, towards the center of the composition or the main object. Other details are serving the primary one.
The opposite happens when the painting is from the extrovert’s point of view.